May 11 — The fog of war. What really happened in Mariupol, Melitopol, and at the Hryhorii Skovoroda Literary Memorial Museum?

Over the past few weeks, the Russian campaign has focused on the Donbas region and the southern parts of Ukraine. The bombardment of Kharkiv continues; however, it seems that the aggressors’ target of choice has shifted from the city center to densely populated districts in the outskirts. The names Mariupol, Melitopol, and Kherson have become… Continue reading May 11 — The fog of war. What really happened in Mariupol, Melitopol, and at the Hryhorii Skovoroda Literary Memorial Museum?

April 10th — Lukashovka’s desecrated church; Izyum’s imminent destruction

Last week, the world was shocked and horrified by images of crimes perpetrated by the Russian army in towns and villages near the Ukrainian capital. These outrages were not limited to the hamlet of Bucha. The 400 inhabitants of Lukashovka, a tiny village near Chernihiv, didn’t escape the brutality of the Russian “liberators;” neither did… Continue reading April 10th — Lukashovka’s desecrated church; Izyum’s imminent destruction

April 7th — Kharkiv: Clouds gather over a Constructivist palace.

Ukrainian officials have now issued a warning: the people of Kharkiv must evacuate. Russian forces continue to bombard the city center. According to military analysts and intelligence reports, it seems likely that Kharkiv will become the target of a massive Russian military operation, possibly as a form of revenge for Ukraine’s successful defense of Kyiv.… Continue reading April 7th — Kharkiv: Clouds gather over a Constructivist palace.

April 1 — The sad fate of Trostianets, confirmed; and a visit with the ghosts of Huliaipole

On March 28th, Ukrainian forces liberated Trostianets, a small town in the northeast corner of the country, from its Russian occupiers. Trostianets was under military occupation for thirty days. While a damage assessment is in progress — a job complicated by the mines left by the retreating Russian troops — some things are already clear.… Continue reading April 1 — The sad fate of Trostianets, confirmed; and a visit with the ghosts of Huliaipole

March 28 — New Glories in the “Denazification” Campaign

There have been developments in the mystical “Denazification” that Vladimir Putin gave as one of the primary goals of Russia’s so-called “special military operation” in Ukraine. On March 27th, Russian artillery damaged the Holocaust memorial in Drobytsky Yar in Kharkiv. Drobytsky Yar is a ravine where the Nazis murdered approximately 16,000 people, most of them… Continue reading March 28 — New Glories in the “Denazification” Campaign

March 26th — Dante’s Kyiv; Chernihiv in the Crosshairs

In light of the ongoing bombardment of the Ukrainian capital, the Kyiv city administration has moved to protect monuments in central areas that haven’t yet been targeted. Public monuments, such as the iconic statue of St. Vladimir on Vladimir hill, have been covered in improvised blast shielding. Other memorials and public sculptures — the monument… Continue reading March 26th — Dante’s Kyiv; Chernihiv in the Crosshairs

March 24 — A Farewell to Kuindzhi

On March 11th, we rang alarm bells about the danger to the Arkhip Kuindzhi Art Museum in Mariupol. Unfortunately, on March 23rd, our dire prediction came true: the museum was destroyed. This charming building in the Secession style no longer exists. According to press reports, three paintings by Arkhip Kuindzhi, including “Red Sunset on the… Continue reading March 24 — A Farewell to Kuindzhi

March 20 — To Be a Curator of Lost Art

It should be perfectly clear by now that every museum and architectural monument in Ukraine is in peril. But what about the art that exists everywhere else in the country? Efforts to evacuate and safely store the collections of public institutions are ongoing, but private galleries and the studios of contemporary artists are in a… Continue reading March 20 — To Be a Curator of Lost Art